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Meta employees ‘receive money to unlock accounts’

Meta employees ‘receive money to unlock accounts’

Meta is supposed to fire and discipline dozens of employees because these people are voluntarily trespassing, unlock the hidden Facebook accounts.

According to WSJ, at least over 20 Meta employees used their privilege to unlock their login accounts which are usually permanently disabled by the transmissions of the service. These are irregular accounts that can’t get access through the traditional protocol, like sending a complaint, contact with the administrator team. Therefore, the account holders have reached the third service… where are ready to unlock the account on the street.


Facebook’s name and logo of Meta City since July 10/2021.

Reports say, in some cases, Facebook employees have taken thousands of USD’s bribes from the third key service to interfere with the user account. These men have been put to an end to the contract or being disciplined after the internal investigation. However, they then joined the Allied Universe… the unit that provides security for some of the Meta’s systems. These people continue to have access to Facebook’s interior tool, called “Oops”, also the ability to restore any user accounts.

The Meta doesn’t answer directly about the employees and ex-employees who are voluntarily trespassing on user accounts. However, Meta media director Andy Stone said to CNBC: “Persons who sell fraud services are always targeting online bases, which is ours, then adjusting the operation normally in the entire industry.”

According to Stone’s recommendations, the user shouldn’t be selling accounts or paying for the account service for violating Facebook terms. Besides, you said Meta frequently updated security measures, and there will also be “appropriate action” to stop the problem.

Allied Universal has yet to comment.

Written by hoangphat

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